Humpback Whale | Megaptera novaeangliae
(by Penti’s Pics)

Humpback Whale | Megaptera novaeangliae

(by Penti’s Pics)



Pygmy Killer Whale | Feresa attenuata

"2012 in KK started with some excitement as a pygmy killer whale was found stranded close to the beach at Tanjung Aru, it was moved to the protected bay at Shangri-La hotel by WWF and Sabah Wildlife. It was then cared for by volunteers for 36 hours until it was strong enough to be released out in the deeper water beyond TARP marine park."

(by SCUBAZOO)

Pygmy Killer Whale | Feresa attenuata

"2012 in KK started with some excitement as a pygmy killer whale was found stranded close to the beach at Tanjung Aru, it was moved to the protected bay at Shangri-La hotel by WWF and Sabah Wildlife. It was then cared for by volunteers for 36 hours until it was strong enough to be released out in the deeper water beyond TARP marine park."

(by SCUBAZOO)



Juvenile Humpback Whale | Megaptera novaeangliae
(by pats0n)

Juvenile Humpback Whale | Megaptera novaeangliae

(by pats0n)



Whale Shark | Rhincodon typus

“The whale shark is a filter feeder that sieves small animals from the water. As it swims with its mouth open, it sucks masses of water filled with prey into its mouth and through spongy tissue between its 5 large gill arches. After closing its mouth, the shark uses gills rakers that filter the nourishment from the water. Anything that doesn’t pass through the gills is eaten.” - 

(by tobze)

Whale Shark | Rhincodon typus

The whale shark is a filter feeder that sieves small animals from the water. As it swims with its mouth open, it sucks masses of water filled with prey into its mouth and through spongy tissue between its 5 large gill arches. After closing its mouth, the shark uses gills rakers that filter the nourishment from the water. Anything that doesn’t pass through the gills is eaten.” - 

(by tobze)



Beluga Whale | Delphinapterus leucas
(by Joanna_Pan)

Beluga Whale | Delphinapterus leucas

(by Joanna_Pan)



Humpback Whale & Calf | Megaptera novaeangliae

“Mothers and their young swim close together, often touching one another with their flippers with what appear to be gestures of affection. Females nurse their calves for almost a year, though it takes far longer than that for a humpback whale to reach full adulthood. Calves do not stop growing until they are ten years old.” -

(by Réunion Underwater Photography)

Humpback Whale & Calf | Megaptera novaeangliae

Mothers and their young swim close together, often touching one another with their flippers with what appear to be gestures of affection. Females nurse their calves for almost a year, though it takes far longer than that for a humpback whale to reach full adulthood. Calves do not stop growing until they are ten years old.” -

(by Réunion Underwater Photography)



Humpback Whale | Megaptera novaeangliae
(by pats0n)

Humpback Whale | Megaptera novaeangliae

(by pats0n)




Humpback Whale | Megaptera novaeangliae

(by RussellK2013)



Humpback Whale | Megaptera novaeangliae
(by Glen Tepke)

Humpback Whale | Megaptera novaeangliae

(by Glen Tepke)



Humpback Whale | Megaptera novaeangliae

“Humpback whales are the noisiest and most imaginative whales when it comes to songs. They have long, varied, complex, eerie, and beautiful songs that include recognizable sequences of squeaks, grunts, and other sounds. The songs have the largest range of frequencies used by whales, ranging from 20-9,000 Hertz. Only males have been recorded singing. They sing the complex songs only in warm waters, perhaps used for mating purposes. In cold waters, they make rougher sounds, scrapes and groans, perhaps used for locating large masses of krill (the tiny crustaceans that they eat)." -

(by jason tinder)

Humpback Whale | Megaptera novaeangliae

Humpback whales are the noisiest and most imaginative whales when it comes to songs. They have long, varied, complex, eerie, and beautiful songs that include recognizable sequences of squeaks, grunts, and other sounds. The songs have the largest range of frequencies used by whales, ranging from 20-9,000 Hertz. Only males have been recorded singing. They sing the complex songs only in warm waters, perhaps used for mating purposes. In cold waters, they make rougher sounds, scrapes and groans, perhaps used for locating large masses of krill (the tiny crustaceans that they eat).-

(by jason tinder)



Orca | Orcinus orca
(by Cornforth Images)

Orca | Orcinus orca

(by Cornforth Images)



Beluga Whale | Delphinapterus leucas

“Belugas are also called white whales, and their unusual color makes them one of the most familiar and easily distinguishable of all the whales. Calves are born gray or even brown and only fade to white as they become sexually mature around five years of age.
White whales are smallish, ranging from 13 to 20 feet (4 to 6.1 meters) in length. They have rounded foreheads and no dorsal fin.
Belugas generally live together in small groups known as pods. They are social animals and very vocal communicators that employ a diversified language of clicks, whistles, and clangs. Belugas can also mimic a variety of other sounds.”   -

(by AndrewRBrown)

Beluga Whale | Delphinapterus leucas

Belugas are also called white whales, and their unusual color makes them one of the most familiar and easily distinguishable of all the whales. Calves are born gray or even brown and only fade to white as they become sexually mature around five years of age.

White whales are smallish, ranging from 13 to 20 feet (4 to 6.1 meters) in length. They have rounded foreheads and no dorsal fin.

Belugas generally live together in small groups known as pods. They are social animals and very vocal communicators that employ a diversified language of clicks, whistles, and clangs. Belugas can also mimic a variety of other sounds.”   -

(by AndrewRBrown)



Beluga Whale | Delphinapterus leucas

“Unlike most other whales, the beluga has a flexible neck that enables it to turn its head in all directions.
Beluga feed on fish, crustaceans, and worms. The whale is related to the tusked “unicorn” whale known as the narwhal. The beluga is not related to the sturgeon of the same name, which has been heavily fished for its famous caviar.”   -

(by RafaMontero)

Beluga Whale | Delphinapterus leucas

Unlike most other whales, the beluga has a flexible neck that enables it to turn its head in all directions.

Beluga feed on fish, crustaceans, and worms. The whale is related to the tusked “unicorn” whale known as the narwhal. The beluga is not related to the sturgeon of the same name, which has been heavily fished for its famous caviar.”   -

(by RafaMontero)



Beluga Whale | Delphinapterus leucas

“These whales are common in the Arctic Ocean’s coastal waters, though they are found in subarctic waters as well. Arctic belugas migrate southward in large herds when the sea freezes over. Animals trapped by Arctic ice often die, and they are prey for polar bears, killer whales, and for Arctic people. They are hunted by indigenous people of the north, and by commercial fisheries that brought some populations, such as those in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, to near collapse.”   -

(by ArcticWatch)

Beluga Whale | Delphinapterus leucas

These whales are common in the Arctic Ocean’s coastal waters, though they are found in subarctic waters as well. Arctic belugas migrate southward in large herds when the sea freezes over. Animals trapped by Arctic ice often die, and they are prey for polar bears, killer whales, and for Arctic people. They are hunted by indigenous people of the north, and by commercial fisheries that brought some populations, such as those in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, to near collapse.”   -

(by ArcticWatch)



Humpback Whale | Megaptera novaeangliae

“These whales are known for their complex mating songs. Researchers have studied the whale songs for years, and the complexity of these songs suggests the whales are extremely intelligent creatures. Only the males are responsible for the whale songs, however, since they are primarily a mating signal. Additionally, these whales are famous for the water acrobatics. Humpback whales can frequently be seen leaping out of the water and sometimes can use their flukes to propel themselves completely out of the ocean.”   -

(by Réunion Underwater Photography)

Humpback Whale | Megaptera novaeangliae

These whales are known for their complex mating songs. Researchers have studied the whale songs for years, and the complexity of these songs suggests the whales are extremely intelligent creatures. Only the males are responsible for the whale songs, however, since they are primarily a mating signal. Additionally, these whales are famous for the water acrobatics. Humpback whales can frequently be seen leaping out of the water and sometimes can use their flukes to propel themselves completely out of the ocean.”   -

(by Réunion Underwater Photography)