Common Sunstar | Crossaster papposus
(by Jlynott)

Common Sunstar | Crossaster papposus

(by Jlynott)




A swimming Ocean Sunfish, also known as the Mola mola!

"The mola are the heaviest of all the bony fish, with large specimens reaching 14 feet (4.2 meters) vertically and 10 feet (3.1 meters) horizontally and weighing nearly 5,000 pounds (2,268 kilograms). Sharks and rays can be heavier, but they’re cartilaginous fish.

Ocean sunfish can become so infested with skin parasites, they will often invite small fish or even birds to feast on the pesky critters. They will even breach the surface up to 10 feet (3 meters) in the air and land with a splash in an attempt to shake the parasites.”   -

(Video by I’d rather be…



Bluegill Fry | Lepomis macrochirus
(by Lance Merry)

Bluegill Fry | Lepomis macrochirus

(by Lance Merry)



Sunfish | Mola mola

"Mola are found in temperate and tropical oceans around the world. They are frequently seen basking in the sun near the surface and are often mistaken for sharks when their huge dorsal fins emerge above the water. Their teeth are fused into a beak-like structure, and they are unable to fully close their relatively small mouths.
They are clumsy swimmers, waggling their large dorsal and anal fins to move and steering with their clavus. Their food of choice is jellyfish, though they will eat small fish and huge amounts of zooplankton and algae as well. They are harmless to people, but can be very curious and will often approach divers.”   -

(by Dieter Müßler)

Sunfish | Mola mola

"Mola are found in temperate and tropical oceans around the world. They are frequently seen basking in the sun near the surface and are often mistaken for sharks when their huge dorsal fins emerge above the water. Their teeth are fused into a beak-like structure, and they are unable to fully close their relatively small mouths.

They are clumsy swimmers, waggling their large dorsal and anal fins to move and steering with their clavus. Their food of choice is jellyfish, though they will eat small fish and huge amounts of zooplankton and algae as well. They are harmless to people, but can be very curious and will often approach divers.”   -

(by Dieter Müßler)



Ocean Sunfish | Mola mola
(by astio)

Ocean Sunfish | Mola mola

(by astio)



Ocean Sunfish | Mola mola
(by peterszustka)

Ocean Sunfish | Mola mola

(by peterszustka)



Ocean Sunfish | Mola mola 
(by MaríaMazarías)

Ocean Sunfish | Mola mola

(by MaríaMazarías)



Ocean Sunfish | Mola Mola 
(by Zanthia)

Ocean Sunfish | Mola Mola

(by Zanthia)



Ocean Sunfish | Mola mola 
(by Anna Mizi)

Ocean Sunfish | Mola mola

(by Anna Mizi)



Ocean Sunfish | Mola mola

The largest ocean sunfish ever measured was over 10 feet across, and weighed close to 5,000 pounds. On average, ocean sunfish weigh about 2,000 pounds. This makes them the largest bony fish species. x

(Photo by MOHAMED TAZI)

Ocean Sunfish | Mola mola

The largest ocean sunfish ever measured was over 10 feet across, and weighed close to 5,000 pounds. On average, ocean sunfish weigh about 2,000 pounds. This makes them the largest bony fish species. x

(Photo by MOHAMED TAZI)



Ocean Sunfish | Mola mola 
(by edwindejongh)

Ocean Sunfish | Mola mola

(by edwindejongh)



Ocean Sunfish | Mola mola 
(by Anna Mizi)

Ocean SunfishMola mola 

(by Anna Mizi)



Long Reef Sunrise :: Sydney, Australia (by -yury-)

Long Reef Sunrise :: Sydney, Australia (by -yury-)