Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

“Pygmy seahorses are morphologically distinct from all other seahorses.  Apart from their extremely small size, they have a single gill opening on the back of the head (all other seahorses have a pair of gill openings either side of the head) and the young are brooded within the male’s trunk rather than a pouch on the tail.” -

(by PacificKlaus)

Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

Pygmy seahorses are morphologically distinct from all other seahorses.  Apart from their extremely small size, they have a single gill opening on the back of the head (all other seahorses have a pair of gill openings either side of the head) and the young are brooded within the male’s trunk rather than a pouch on the tail.” -

(by PacificKlaus)



Western Australian Seahorse | Hippocampus subelongatus
(by Bush-y)

Western Australian Seahorse | Hippocampus subelongatus

(by Bush-y)



Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti
(by JacksonWong)

Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

(by JacksonWong)



Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti
(by JacksonWong)

Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

(by JacksonWong)



Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

“The pygmy seahorse is undoubtedly one of the most well camouflaged species in the oceans, being extremely difficult to spot amongst the gorgonian coral it inhabits. So effective is this camouflage that the species wasn’t actually discovered until its host gorgonian was being examined in a lab."  -

(by gt60k)

Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

The pygmy seahorse is undoubtedly one of the most well camouflaged species in the oceans, being extremely difficult to spot amongst the gorgonian coral it inhabits. So effective is this camouflage that the species wasn’t actually discovered until its host gorgonian was being examined in a lab."  -

(by gt60k)



Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti
(by edpdiver)

Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

(by edpdiver)



Seahorse | Hippocampus
(by Vic DeLeon)

Seahorse | Hippocampus

(by Vic DeLeon)



Long-Snouted Seahorse | Hippocampus guttulatus

"Seahorses have excellent eyesight and their eyes are able to work independently on either side of their head. This means they can look forwards and backwards at the same time! This is particulartly useful as they hunt for food by sight."  - 

(by Raffaele Livornese)

Long-Snouted Seahorse | Hippocampus guttulatus

"Seahorses have excellent eyesight and their eyes are able to work independently on either side of their head. This means they can look forwards and backwards at the same time! This is particulartly useful as they hunt for food by sight."  - 

(by Raffaele Livornese)



Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

"These are among the smallest of all living things in the water when they are born. They do have a higher rate of survival than most species of seahorses though. This is due to the fact that they are among the best at hiding in their natural setting. Their color allows them to blend easier than any other type of seahorse in the world. They have to care for themselves immediately after birth as there is no parental care at all." -

(by imgodell)

Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

"These are among the smallest of all living things in the water when they are born. They do have a higher rate of survival than most species of seahorses though. This is due to the fact that they are among the best at hiding in their natural setting. Their color allows them to blend easier than any other type of seahorse in the world. They have to care for themselves immediately after birth as there is no parental care at all." -

(by imgodell)



Long-Snouted Seahorse | Hippocampus guttulatus
(by Carlos Fernandez-Cid, carloscies)

Long-Snouted Seahorse | Hippocampus guttulatus

(by Carlos Fernandez-Cid, carloscies)



Sydney Pygmy Pipehorse | Idiotropiscis lumnitzeri
(by billunder)

Sydney Pygmy Pipehorse | Idiotropiscis lumnitzeri

(by billunder)



Seahorse | Hippocampus 
(by Matthew Cranston)

Seahorse | Hippocampus

(by Matthew Cranston)



Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti
(by Martin-Klein)

Pygmy SeahorseHippocampus bargibanti

(by Martin-Klein)



Seahorse | Hippocampus
(by Eugene Rothman)

SeahorseHippocampus

(by Eugene Rothman)



Seahorse | Hippocampus 

Seahorses propel themselves by using a small fin on their back that flutters up to 35 times per second. Even smaller pectoral fins located near the back of the head are used for steering.  x

(Photo by inreflection)

SeahorseHippocampus 

Seahorses propel themselves by using a small fin on their back that flutters up to 35 times per second. Even smaller pectoral fins located near the back of the head are used for steering.  x

(Photo by inreflection)