Snowflake Moray Eel | Echidna nebulosa

“Like any of these serpentlike moray eels, the snowflake moray eel has the bad habit of trying to escape from open aquariums. The snowflake moray eel has the uncanny ability to find and crawl out of the smallest hole in the aquarium top, so make sure all of these holes are well-covered. Echidna nebulosa also are prone to sliding over corner overflow boxes and may make their way through PVC plumbing into filter bags or the aquarium sump.” -

(by PacificKlaus)

Snowflake Moray Eel | Echidna nebulosa

Like any of these serpentlike moray eels, the snowflake moray eel has the bad habit of trying to escape from open aquariums. The snowflake moray eel has the uncanny ability to find and crawl out of the smallest hole in the aquarium top, so make sure all of these holes are well-covered. Echidna nebulosa also are prone to sliding over corner overflow boxes and may make their way through PVC plumbing into filter bags or the aquarium sump.” -

(by PacificKlaus)



Jellyfish | Medusozoa
(by KtSeery)

Jellyfish | Medusozoa

(by KtSeery)



Octopus | Octopus vulgaris
(by DerekBrad)

Octopus | Octopus vulgaris

(by DerekBrad)



Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

“Pygmy seahorses are morphologically distinct from all other seahorses.  Apart from their extremely small size, they have a single gill opening on the back of the head (all other seahorses have a pair of gill openings either side of the head) and the young are brooded within the male’s trunk rather than a pouch on the tail.” -

(by PacificKlaus)

Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

Pygmy seahorses are morphologically distinct from all other seahorses.  Apart from their extremely small size, they have a single gill opening on the back of the head (all other seahorses have a pair of gill openings either side of the head) and the young are brooded within the male’s trunk rather than a pouch on the tail.” -

(by PacificKlaus)



Clownfish | Amphiprioninae
(by slw74)

Clownfish | Amphiprioninae

(by slw74)



Longhorn Cowfish | Lactoria cornuta

“When foraging, the Longhorn Cowfish often blows jets of water out of its mouth at the sand surface to uncover buried prey (this is known as hydraulic jetting). This is an effective method for uncovering hidden prey in sandy lagoon areas that the cowfish frequents.” -

(by Michael Bentley)

Longhorn Cowfish | Lactoria cornuta

When foraging, the Longhorn Cowfish often blows jets of water out of its mouth at the sand surface to uncover buried prey (this is known as hydraulic jetting). This is an effective method for uncovering hidden prey in sandy lagoon areas that the cowfish frequents.” -

(by Michael Bentley)



Great White Shark | Carcharodon carcharias
(by cathm2)

Great White Shark | Carcharodon carcharias

(by cathm2)



Black Tipped Sharks | Carcharhinus limbatus
(by Paul Cowell)

Black Tipped Sharks | Carcharhinus limbatus

(by Paul Cowell)



Weedy Sea Dragon | Phyllopteryx taeniolatus

“Seadragons do not have teeth or stomachs and because they lack stomachs, they eat almost constantly and over wide areas, feeding on mysid shrimp and other small crustaceans, plankton, and larval fish. A seadragon uses its long. thin, tubular snout to create a strong suction with which to rapidly suck in the food item. It expands a joint on the lower part of its snout and swallows its prey whole. Special muscles in the snout can widen to accommodate different sizes of prey.” -(by O9k)

Weedy Sea Dragon | Phyllopteryx taeniolatus

Seadragons do not have teeth or stomachs and because they lack stomachs, they eat almost constantly and over wide areas, feeding on mysid shrimp and other small crustaceans, plankton, and larval fish. A seadragon uses its long. thin, tubular snout to create a strong suction with which to rapidly suck in the food item. It expands a joint on the lower part of its snout and swallows its prey whole. Special muscles in the snout can widen to accommodate different sizes of prey.” -

(by O9k)



Moon Jellyfish | Aurelia aurita
(by FabricePics)

Moon Jellyfish | Aurelia aurita

(by FabricePics)



Caribbean Reef Shark | Carcharhinus perezi
(by Alastair Pollock)

Caribbean Reef Shark | Carcharhinus perezi

(by Alastair Pollock)



Yellow Tang | Zebrasoma flavescens

“Most Yellow Tangs collected for the marine aquarium hobby come from Hawaii. Growing to about 20 centimeters, the yellow tang prefers coral reefs in both protected lagoons and seaward reefs. In the wild, yellow tangs may be seen singly or in groups constantly picking at the reef in their perpetual pursuit of filamentous algae.” -

(by Alvaroabella)

Yellow Tang | Zebrasoma flavescens

Most Yellow Tangs collected for the marine aquarium hobby come from Hawaii. Growing to about 20 centimeters, the yellow tang prefers coral reefs in both protected lagoons and seaward reefs. In the wild, yellow tangs may be seen singly or in groups constantly picking at the reef in their perpetual pursuit of filamentous algae.” -

(by Alvaroabella)



Fu Manchu Lionfish | Dendrochirus biocellatus

“The Fu Manchu Lionfish is found in the Indo-Pacific. Its geographical range stretches from Mauritius, Reunion, The Maldives and Sri Lanka to the Society Islands in French Polynesia. Northwards, these fishes can be found up to the southern parts of Japan, and southwards their range proceeds to Scott Reef northwest of Australia.
The Fu Manchu Lionfish habitats are clear tropical waters with prolific coral growth. The depths range for this species is 1-40 meters / 33-131 feet. During the day, the Fu Manchu Lionfish will typically stay hidden in caves or among sponges on the reef.” -

(by mcnato)

Fu Manchu Lionfish | Dendrochirus biocellatus

The Fu Manchu Lionfish is found in the Indo-Pacific. Its geographical range stretches from Mauritius, Reunion, The Maldives and Sri Lanka to the Society Islands in French Polynesia. Northwards, these fishes can be found up to the southern parts of Japan, and southwards their range proceeds to Scott Reef northwest of Australia.

The Fu Manchu Lionfish habitats are clear tropical waters with prolific coral growth. The depths range for this species is 1-40 meters / 33-131 feet. During the day, the Fu Manchu Lionfish will typically stay hidden in caves or among sponges on the reef.” -

(by mcnato)



Picasso Trigger | Rhinecanthus aculeatus

“The Picasso species behaves in the typical aggressive Triggerfish manor. However, it may be housed with members of the same genus, if they are all added at the same time and ample space and housing is provided. Same species juveniles can be kept together, but as they mature fights are likely to occur between them. The Picasso Trigger is best kept in an aquarium with other similarly aggressive species of the same size or larger, as it may opportunistically eat smaller fish.” -

(by ~*~Rageybug~*~)

Picasso Trigger | Rhinecanthus aculeatus

The Picasso species behaves in the typical aggressive Triggerfish manor. However, it may be housed with members of the same genus, if they are all added at the same time and ample space and housing is provided. Same species juveniles can be kept together, but as they mature fights are likely to occur between them. The Picasso Trigger is best kept in an aquarium with other similarly aggressive species of the same size or larger, as it may opportunistically eat smaller fish.” -

(by ~*~Rageybug~*~)



Scalloped Hammerhead | Sphyrna lewini
(by fjparrillaperez)

Scalloped Hammerhead | Sphyrna lewini

(by fjparrillaperez)