Short-Tailed Stingray | Dasyatis brevicaudata

"The Smooth Stingray is curious and will approach swimmers and divers, especially if there is bait or berley in the water. While these animals are easily trained to take hand-held bait, they are potentially dangerous if they retain their large barbed spines. When threatened they will curl their tail up and over their back in a threat display."   -

(by Rowland Cain)

Short-Tailed Stingray | Dasyatis brevicaudata

"The Smooth Stingray is curious and will approach swimmers and divers, especially if there is bait or berley in the water. While these animals are easily trained to take hand-held bait, they are potentially dangerous if they retain their large barbed spines. When threatened they will curl their tail up and over their back in a threat display."   -

(by Rowland Cain)



Shovelnose Guitarfish | Rhinobatos productus

“Typically inhabiting shallow waters around beaches, bays and estuaries, the shovelnose guitarfish usually lies partially buried on sandy or muddy bottoms, and is occasionally also seen in sea grass beds. It usually occurs at depths of up to 13 metres, but has been recorded down to 91 metres.”   -

(by Rowland Cain)

Shovelnose GuitarfishRhinobatos productus

Typically inhabiting shallow waters around beaches, bays and estuaries, the shovelnose guitarfish usually lies partially buried on sandy or muddy bottoms, and is occasionally also seen in sea grass beds. It usually occurs at depths of up to 13 metres, but has been recorded down to 91 metres.”   -

(by Rowland Cain)



Spotted Eagle Ray | Aetobatus narinari
(by BarryFackler)

Spotted Eagle Ray | Aetobatus narinari

(by BarryFackler)



Short-Tail Stingray | Dasyatis brevicaudata

"The venomous spine on the short-tail stingray half way along the tail is capable of inflicting severe or potentially fatal wound. It is sometimes seen raising its tail above its back like a scorpion."  -

(by Rowland Cain)

Short-Tail Stingray | Dasyatis brevicaudata

"The venomous spine on the short-tail stingray half way along the tail is capable of inflicting severe or potentially fatal wound. It is sometimes seen raising its tail above its back like a scorpion."  -

(by Rowland Cain)



Round Ribbontail Ray | Taeniura meyeni

"The female black blotched fantail ray gives birth to live young. The young are about 13 inches in width when born."  -

(by James R.D. Scott)

Round Ribbontail Ray | Taeniura meyeni

"The female black blotched fantail ray gives birth to live young. The young are about 13 inches in width when born."  -

(by James R.D. Scott)



Spotted Eagle Ray | Aetobatus narinari

“Clams, oysters, shrimp, octopus, squid and sea urchins as well as bony fishes provide prey for the spotted eagle ray. This ray is well adapted with its shovel-shaped snout and duck-like bill for searching in the mud for benthic invertebrates. When a prey item is found, the ray crushes it with its plate-like teeth and uses the papillae located in the mouth to separate the shells from the flesh.”   -

(by BarryFackler)

Spotted Eagle Ray | Aetobatus narinari

Clams, oysters, shrimp, octopus, squid and sea urchins as well as bony fishes provide prey for the spotted eagle ray. This ray is well adapted with its shovel-shaped snout and duck-like bill for searching in the mud for benthic invertebrates. When a prey item is found, the ray crushes it with its plate-like teeth and uses the papillae located in the mouth to separate the shells from the flesh.”   -

(by BarryFackler)



Reef Manta Ray | Manta alfredi

“We know that there are 11 species in the ray family, counting both manta rays and mobula rays (now among the world’s most threatened fish). Manta rays were only split into two species in 2009, and there’s reason to believe there is a third species residing in the Atlantic.”  -

(by Fabrice Jaine)

Reef Manta Ray | Manta alfredi

We know that there are 11 species in the ray family, counting both manta rays and mobula rays (now among the world’s most threatened fish). Manta rays were only split into two species in 2009, and there’s reason to believe there is a third species residing in the Atlantic.”  -

(by Fabrice Jaine)




Bat Ray | Myliobatis californica

"Bat ray teeth are fused into plates that can crush the strongest clam shells. The rays crush the entire clam, or other molluscs, inside their mouths, spit out the shells, and then eat the soft, fleshy parts. If a tooth breaks or wears out, a new one replaces it. Rays grow new teeth continuously, like their shark kin."   -

(Photos by divindk)



Ray | Dasyatidae
(by zoohiko)

Ray | Dasyatidae

(by zoohiko)



Manta Ray | Manta birostris (by Frankyboy73)

Manta Ray | Manta birostris

(by Frankyboy73)



Manta Ray | Manta birostris
(by scuba tim)

Manta Ray | Manta birostris

(by scuba tim)




Stingray | Dasyatidae

"Ancient Greek dentists used the venom from the stingray’s spine as an anesthetic."  -

(Photos by Giovanni Mari)




StingrayDasyatidae

(Photos by disolep)



Manta Ray | Manta birostris

"The manta ray is a solitary animal and is also a graceful swimmer. Like other large species of fish, manta rays swim by moving their pectoral fins up and down which propels their enormous body through the surrounding water. The short tail of the manta ray also allows the manta ray to be more acrobatic with it’s movement, and they have even be seen leaping out of the water."  -

(Photo by edpdiver)

Manta Ray | Manta birostris

"The manta ray is a solitary animal and is also a graceful swimmer. Like other large species of fish, manta rays swim by moving their pectoral fins up and down which propels their enormous body through the surrounding water. The short tail of the manta ray also allows the manta ray to be more acrobatic with it’s movement, and they have even be seen leaping out of the water."  -

(Photo by edpdiver)



Spotted Eagle Ray | Aetobatus narinari
(by SteveD.)

Spotted Eagle Ray | Aetobatus narinari

(by SteveD.)