Dog-Faced Puffer | Arothron nigropunctatus
(by edpdiver)

Dog-Faced Puffer | Arothron nigropunctatus

(by edpdiver)



Balloonfish | Diodon holocanthus
(by www.edufiend.com)

Balloonfish | Diodon holocanthus

(by www.edufiend.com)



Valentinni’s Sharpnose Puffer | Canthigaster valentini

“Valentinni’s Puffer Fish secrete a type of mucus, or slime, from their skin. This slime provides protection against parasites and infections and helps the Valentinni’s Puffer Fish to move through the water faster. Some fish species also release toxins in their slime which ward off enemy attacks. Other fish species use their slime to feed their young.”  -

(by deadlydisk)

Valentinni’s Sharpnose Puffer | Canthigaster valentini

Valentinni’s Puffer Fish secrete a type of mucus, or slime, from their skin. This slime provides protection against parasites and infections and helps the Valentinni’s Puffer Fish to move through the water faster. Some fish species also release toxins in their slime which ward off enemy attacks. Other fish species use their slime to feed their young.”  -

(by deadlydisk)



Long-Spine Porcupinefish | Diodon holocanthus

"Long-spined Porcupinefish are nocturnal and usually solitary. They feed on hard-shelled invertebrates. Larger individuals are found in a variety of benthic habitats from shallow reefs to open, soft bottoms to at least 100 m. In some areas, Long-spined Porcupinefish are harvested and dried in their inflated state for sale to tourists."  -

(by Arne Kuilman)

Long-Spine Porcupinefish | Diodon holocanthus

"Long-spined Porcupinefish are nocturnal and usually solitary. They feed on hard-shelled invertebrates. Larger individuals are found in a variety of benthic habitats from shallow reefs to open, soft bottoms to at least 100 m. In some areas, Long-spined Porcupinefish are harvested and dried in their inflated state for sale to tourists."  -

(by Arne Kuilman)



Porcupinefish | Diodontidae

"Some predators, such as tiger sharks and sea snakes, are unbothered by the pufferfish’s natural toxins."   -

(by Tè Bwa Dlô)

Porcupinefish | Diodontidae

"Some predators, such as tiger sharks and sea snakes, are unbothered by the pufferfish’s natural toxins."   -

(by Tè Bwa Dlô)



Black Spotted Pufferfish | Arothron nigropunctatus
(by edpdiver)

Black Spotted Pufferfish | Arothron nigropunctatus

(by edpdiver)



Saddle Valentini Pufferfish | Canthigaster valentini
(by robs cruising & diving pics)

Saddle Valentini Pufferfish | Canthigaster valentini

(by robs cruising & diving pics)



Juvenile Star Puffer | Arothron stellatus
(by Sunphol Sorakul)

Juvenile Star Puffer | Arothron stellatus

(by Sunphol Sorakul)



Long-Spined Pufferfish | Diodon holocanthus 
(by jamesbooth_london)

Long-Spined Pufferfish | Diodon holocanthus 

(by jamesbooth_london)



Dog-Faced Pufferfish | Arothron nigropunctatus 
(by iSharQ)

Dog-Faced PufferfishArothron nigropunctatus 

(by iSharQ)



Masked Puffer | Arothron diadematus
(by Marco Paravella)

Masked Puffer | Arothron diadematus

(by Marco Paravella)



Goliath Grouper feeding on a Pufferfish | Epinephelus itajara feeding on Tetraodontidae
(by TheLivingSea.com)

Goliath Grouper feeding on a PufferfishEpinephelus itajara feeding on Tetraodontidae

(by TheLivingSea.com)



Three-Barred Porcupinefish | Dicotylichthys punctulatus 
(by richard ling)

Three-Barred PorcupinefishDicotylichthys punctulatus 

(by richard ling)



Peacock Puffer | Takifugu ocellatus 
(by Recombinant Rider)

Peacock PufferTakifugu ocellatus 

(by Recombinant Rider)



Green Spotted Puffer | Tetraodon nigroviridis 
(by Bois Kowski)

Green Spotted PufferTetraodon nigroviridis 

(by Bois Kowski)