Octopus | Octopus vulgaris
(by DerekBrad)

Octopus | Octopus vulgaris

(by DerekBrad)



Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena lunulata
(by Luko Gecko)

Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena lunulata

(by Luko Gecko)



Mimic Octopus | Thaumoctopus mimicus
(by edpdiver)

Mimic Octopus | Thaumoctopus mimicus

(by edpdiver)



Blue-Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena maculosa

“With its fascinating coloring and delicate curling arms, the blue-ringed octopus may be a beautiful creature, but this small cephalopod is also deadly. The blue-ringed octopus appears grey or beige with light brown patches when it is at rest, but when agitated its 50 or 60 bright blue rings appear and pulsate with color, as a warning. Inside the salivary glands of the blue-ringed octopus live colonies of bacteria that produce tetrodotoxin, the potent neurotoxin found in pufferfish and other animals. A bite from a blue-ringed octopus can completely paralyze and kill an adult human in a matter of minutes. There is no known antidote. The octopus itself is not affected at all by the toxin-an evolutionary prerequisite for the symbiotic relationship that has developed between the blue-ringed octopus and the toxin-producing bacteria.” -

(Photo by Chris Reschman)

Blue-Ringed OctopusHapalochlaena maculosa

With its fascinating coloring and delicate curling arms, the blue-ringed octopus may be a beautiful creature, but this small cephalopod is also deadly. The blue-ringed octopus appears grey or beige with light brown patches when it is at rest, but when agitated its 50 or 60 bright blue rings appear and pulsate with color, as a warning. Inside the salivary glands of the blue-ringed octopus live colonies of bacteria that produce tetrodotoxin, the potent neurotoxin found in pufferfish and other animals. A bite from a blue-ringed octopus can completely paralyze and kill an adult human in a matter of minutes. There is no known antidote. The octopus itself is not affected at all by the toxin-an evolutionary prerequisite for the symbiotic relationship that has developed between the blue-ringed octopus and the toxin-producing bacteria.” -

(Photo by Chris Reschman)



Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena
(by nadeika_k)

Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena

(by nadeika_k)



Mimic Octopus mimicing a Flounder | Thaumoctopus mimicus 

(by allisonfinch)

Mimic Octopus mimicing a Flounder | Thaumoctopus mimicus

(by allisonfinch)



Atlantic White-spotted Octopus | Octopus macropus
(by ondaeoliana)

Atlantic White-spotted Octopus | Octopus macropus

(by ondaeoliana)



Blue Ring Octopus | Hapalochlaena

“The life cycle of the southern blue-ringed octopus, from mating through to the eggs hatching and the young reaching maturity, lasts for approximately seven months. The eggs are carried by the female throughout their development, which lasts for around two months, and the female does not eat during this time. Once hatched, the young grow rapidly and begin hunting live prey within one month. Young southern blue-ringed octopuses are thought to be venomous from birth, and their blue rings appear when they are about six weeks old.
This species reaches sexual maturity at just four months old, and may begin laying eggs a month after that. The adult female southern blue-ringed octopus dies shortly after the eggs have hatched, and both sexes are unlikely to live for more than one year.”  -

(by Lea’s UW Photography)

Blue Ring Octopus | Hapalochlaena

The life cycle of the southern blue-ringed octopus, from mating through to the eggs hatching and the young reaching maturity, lasts for approximately seven months. The eggs are carried by the female throughout their development, which lasts for around two months, and the female does not eat during this time. Once hatched, the young grow rapidly and begin hunting live prey within one month. Young southern blue-ringed octopuses are thought to be venomous from birth, and their blue rings appear when they are about six weeks old.

This species reaches sexual maturity at just four months old, and may begin laying eggs a month after that. The adult female southern blue-ringed octopus dies shortly after the eggs have hatched, and both sexes are unlikely to live for more than one year.”  -

(by Lea’s UW Photography)



Blue-Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena

“Biting with their beak and releasing their neurotoxin via saliva, the blue-ringed octopus will wait until the victim is rendered useless before consuming. One type of toxin is used to kill the prey and the other is used as a defense. It is even speculated that they don’t need to bite their prey at all, casting the venom near their prey may be all that is needed to kill.”   -

(by nadeika_k)

Blue-Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena

Biting with their beak and releasing their neurotoxin via saliva, the blue-ringed octopus will wait until the victim is rendered useless before consuming. One type of toxin is used to kill the prey and the other is used as a defense. It is even speculated that they don’t need to bite their prey at all, casting the venom near their prey may be all that is needed to kill.”   -

(by nadeika_k)



Dumbo Octopus | Grimpoteuthis

"Grimpoteuthis has one of the most unusual breeding capabilities of any marine life. Females necropsied have shown eggs in various stages of maturation which means that there is no breeding season and females can lay eggs continuously under small rocks or on shells in the deep ocean. Males have a separate protuberance on one of their arms that transports an encapsulated sperm packet into the female’s mantle. It is thought the female can utilize sperm for fertilization at almost any time.
Neutrally buoyant, they have several observed types of mobility. Flapping their Dumbo ear-like fins gets them moving with peculiar grace and ease. Expanding and contracting the webbing between their tentacles or by shooting water through their funnel cause a sudden thrust, useful for escaping a predator. Any of these methods for movement can be used separately or simultaneously. These octopus can also do the more ordinary octopus movements such as crawling on their tentacles.”  -

(Photo by OurBreathingPlanet)

Dumbo Octopus | Grimpoteuthis

"Grimpoteuthis has one of the most unusual breeding capabilities of any marine life. Females necropsied have shown eggs in various stages of maturation which means that there is no breeding season and females can lay eggs continuously under small rocks or on shells in the deep ocean. Males have a separate protuberance on one of their arms that transports an encapsulated sperm packet into the female’s mantle. It is thought the female can utilize sperm for fertilization at almost any time.

Neutrally buoyant, they have several observed types of mobility. Flapping their Dumbo ear-like fins gets them moving with peculiar grace and ease. Expanding and contracting the webbing between their tentacles or by shooting water through their funnel cause a sudden thrust, useful for escaping a predator. Any of these methods for movement can be used separately or simultaneously. These octopus can also do the more ordinary octopus movements such as crawling on their tentacles.”  -

(Photo by OurBreathingPlanet)



Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena

"It is most active after dark, and spends most of its day hidden in its nest. Like all octopods, the blue-ringed octopus has no skeleton and is thus very flexible and maneuverable. It can squeeze into tiny crevices and make dens in bottles, aluminum cans, or mollusk shells. The blue-ringed octopus is also known to burrow into sand or gravel to conceal itself."   -

(by Andrew Newton)

Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena

"It is most active after dark, and spends most of its day hidden in its nest. Like all octopods, the blue-ringed octopus has no skeleton and is thus very flexible and maneuverable. It can squeeze into tiny crevices and make dens in bottles, aluminum cans, or mollusk shells. The blue-ringed octopus is also known to burrow into sand or gravel to conceal itself."   -

(by Andrew Newton)



Blue-Lined Octopus | Hapalochlaena fasciata

"This species is highly toxic. The venom is produced by bacteria housed in the salivary glands of the octopus, and injected into the prey through a bite from its small parrot-like beak. It is responsible for at least one human death, where voluntary muscles are paralysed – so while the heart continues to beat, death is caused by breathing failure."  -

(by lndr)

Blue-Lined Octopus | Hapalochlaena fasciata

"This species is highly toxic. The venom is produced by bacteria housed in the salivary glands of the octopus, and injected into the prey through a bite from its small parrot-like beak. It is responsible for at least one human death, where voluntary muscles are paralysed – so while the heart continues to beat, death is caused by breathing failure."  -

(by lndr)



Octopus | Octopus vulgaris
(by ckom1)

Octopus | Octopus vulgaris

(by ckom1)



Southern Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena Maculosa 
(by Bush-y)

Southern Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena Maculosa

(by Bush-y)




Coconut Octopus in a shell | Amphioctopus marginatus

The Coconut Octopus is named so for a very peculiar behavior: it carries coconut shells and clam shells across the ocean floor and uses them to build fortresses. it is the only invertebrate known to use tools, and one of only two octopuses known to exhibit bipedal behavior by “walking” on two of it’s legs.”  -

(Photos by Allison Finch)