Orange Clownfish | Amphiprion percula
(by FabricePics)

Orange Clownfish | Amphiprion percula

(by FabricePics)



Peacock Flounder | Bothus mancus

“In shallow waters, peacock flounders live on sandy bottoms of coastal coral reefs and lagoons. Sometimes, these fish take a break on smooth rocks. This flounder will even bury itself under the sand, leaving only its eyes sticking out from the sand. These flounders can be found to depths of 280 feet (84 m).” -

(by photos by mhl)

Peacock Flounder | Bothus mancus

In shallow waters, peacock flounders live on sandy bottoms of coastal coral reefs and lagoons. Sometimes, these fish take a break on smooth rocks. This flounder will even bury itself under the sand, leaving only its eyes sticking out from the sand. These flounders can be found to depths of 280 feet (84 m).” -

(by photos by mhl)



Tiger Shark | Galeocerdo cuvier
(by samui13coconut13)

Tiger Shark | Galeocerdo cuvier

(by samui13coconut13)



Great White Shark | Carcharodon carcharias
(by Shark Zone)

Great White Shark | Carcharodon carcharias

(by Shark Zone)



Common Dolphin Eating a Sardine | Delphinus eating a Sardina pilchardus
(by Paul Cowell)

Common Dolphin Eating a Sardine | Delphinus eating a Sardina pilchardus

(by Paul Cowell)



Orange Clownfish | Amphiprion percula
(by Scott Hanko)

Orange Clownfish | Amphiprion percula

(by Scott Hanko)



Blacktip Reef Shark | Carcharhinus melanopterus

“Blacktip reef sharks live in shallow lagoons and on coral reefs near reef drop-offs. In general, these sharks do not swim deeper than 33 feet (10 m), but can be found as far as 250 feet (75 m) down. These fish also live in mangrove areas, moving in and out with the tide. Blacktip reef sharks even venture into fresh water but don’t swim too far in from the ocean. 
These sharks are active swimmers that can most often be found cruising along the bottom. Sometimes blacktip reef sharks can be found swimming at the surface in very shallow waters. They will travel alone or in small groups.” -

(by PacificKlaus)

Blacktip Reef Shark | Carcharhinus melanopterus

Blacktip reef sharks live in shallow lagoons and on coral reefs near reef drop-offs. In general, these sharks do not swim deeper than 33 feet (10 m), but can be found as far as 250 feet (75 m) down. These fish also live in mangrove areas, moving in and out with the tide. Blacktip reef sharks even venture into fresh water but don’t swim too far in from the ocean. 

These sharks are active swimmers that can most often be found cruising along the bottom. Sometimes blacktip reef sharks can be found swimming at the surface in very shallow waters. They will travel alone or in small groups.” -

(by PacificKlaus)



Snowflake Moray Eel | Echidna nebulosa

“Like any of these serpentlike moray eels, the snowflake moray eel has the bad habit of trying to escape from open aquariums. The snowflake moray eel has the uncanny ability to find and crawl out of the smallest hole in the aquarium top, so make sure all of these holes are well-covered. Echidna nebulosa also are prone to sliding over corner overflow boxes and may make their way through PVC plumbing into filter bags or the aquarium sump.” -

(by PacificKlaus)

Snowflake Moray Eel | Echidna nebulosa

Like any of these serpentlike moray eels, the snowflake moray eel has the bad habit of trying to escape from open aquariums. The snowflake moray eel has the uncanny ability to find and crawl out of the smallest hole in the aquarium top, so make sure all of these holes are well-covered. Echidna nebulosa also are prone to sliding over corner overflow boxes and may make their way through PVC plumbing into filter bags or the aquarium sump.” -

(by PacificKlaus)



Jellyfish | Medusozoa
(by KtSeery)

Jellyfish | Medusozoa

(by KtSeery)



Octopus | Octopus vulgaris
(by DerekBrad)

Octopus | Octopus vulgaris

(by DerekBrad)



Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

“Pygmy seahorses are morphologically distinct from all other seahorses.  Apart from their extremely small size, they have a single gill opening on the back of the head (all other seahorses have a pair of gill openings either side of the head) and the young are brooded within the male’s trunk rather than a pouch on the tail.” -

(by PacificKlaus)

Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

Pygmy seahorses are morphologically distinct from all other seahorses.  Apart from their extremely small size, they have a single gill opening on the back of the head (all other seahorses have a pair of gill openings either side of the head) and the young are brooded within the male’s trunk rather than a pouch on the tail.” -

(by PacificKlaus)



Clownfish | Amphiprioninae
(by slw74)

Clownfish | Amphiprioninae

(by slw74)



Longhorn Cowfish | Lactoria cornuta

“When foraging, the Longhorn Cowfish often blows jets of water out of its mouth at the sand surface to uncover buried prey (this is known as hydraulic jetting). This is an effective method for uncovering hidden prey in sandy lagoon areas that the cowfish frequents.” -

(by Michael Bentley)

Longhorn Cowfish | Lactoria cornuta

When foraging, the Longhorn Cowfish often blows jets of water out of its mouth at the sand surface to uncover buried prey (this is known as hydraulic jetting). This is an effective method for uncovering hidden prey in sandy lagoon areas that the cowfish frequents.” -

(by Michael Bentley)



Great White Shark | Carcharodon carcharias
(by cathm2)

Great White Shark | Carcharodon carcharias

(by cathm2)



Black Tipped Sharks | Carcharhinus limbatus
(by Paul Cowell)

Black Tipped Sharks | Carcharhinus limbatus

(by Paul Cowell)