Garden Eels | Heterocongrinae
(by divindk)

Garden Eels | Heterocongrinae

(by divindk)



White Eyed Moray Eel | Gymnothorax thyrsoideus
(by Niall Deiraniya Underwater Photography)

White Eyed Moray Eel | Gymnothorax thyrsoideus

(by Niall Deiraniya Underwater Photography)



Green Moray Eel | Gymnothorax funebris

“Green morays are nocturnal predators with poor eyesight that primarily use their sense of smell to hunt for fish, squid, octopuses, crabs and occasionally other eels. Green morays have been observed eating octopuses whole as well as tentacle by tentacle.” -

(by jordi benitez -Mikan-)

Green Moray Eel | Gymnothorax funebris

Green morays are nocturnal predators with poor eyesight that primarily use their sense of smell to hunt for fish, squid, octopuses, crabs and occasionally other eels. Green morays have been observed eating octopuses whole as well as tentacle by tentacle.” -

(by jordi benitez -Mikan-)



Snowflake Moray Eel | Echidna nebulosa
(by Aaron Lynton)

Snowflake Moray Eel | Echidna nebulosa

(by Aaron Lynton)



Blue Ribbon Eel | Rhinomuraena quaesita
(by Kirsty Faulkner)

Blue Ribbon Eel | Rhinomuraena quaesita

(by Kirsty Faulkner)



Wolf Eel | Anarrhichthys ocellatus
(by Dan Hershman)

Wolf Eel | Anarrhichthys ocellatus

(by Dan Hershman)



Green Moray Eels | Gymnothorax funebris

"A nocturnal hunter, the green moray has poor eyesight, hunting - fish, squid, crabs, shrimp and occasionally other eels - primarily by smell. During the day, it hides in rocky crevices, with only its head emerging from the opening. Whether or not it is feeding, its mouth is constantly opening and closing, forcing water through its gills for oxygen.” -

(by billunder)

Green Moray Eels | Gymnothorax funebris

"A nocturnal hunter, the green moray has poor eyesight, hunting - fish, squid, crabs, shrimp and occasionally other eels - primarily by smell. During the day, it hides in rocky crevices, with only its head emerging from the opening. Whether or not it is feeding, its mouth is constantly opening and closing, forcing water through its gills for oxygen.” -

(by billunder)



Spotted Moray Eel | Gymnothorax moringa

“Spotted moray eels are coral reef predators with a varied diet, feeding on fish (such as parrotfishes, grunts, trumpetfish and snappers), crustaceans (such as crabs and lobsters) and molluscs (such as octopuses). Spotted moray eels also eat carrion and are known to be cannibalistic. Only very large reef creatures, such as the dog snapper and Nassau grouper, are known to feed on this species.”-

(by edpdiver)

Spotted Moray Eel | Gymnothorax moringa

Spotted moray eels are coral reef predators with a varied diet, feeding on fish (such as parrotfishes, grunts, trumpetfish and snappers), crustaceans (such as crabs and lobsters) and molluscs (such as octopuses). Spotted moray eels also eat carrion and are known to be cannibalistic. Only very large reef creatures, such as the dog snapper and Nassau grouper, are known to feed on this species.”-

(by edpdiver)



Turkey Moray Eel | Gymnothorax meleagris
(by BarryFackler)

Turkey Moray Eel | Gymnothorax meleagris

(by BarryFackler)



Moray Eel | Muraenidae
(by käptncook)

Moray Eel | Muraenidae

(by käptncook)



Wolf Eel | Anarrhichthys ocellatus
(by sub marine)

Wolf Eel | Anarrhichthys ocellatus

(by sub marine)



Giant Moray Eel | Gymnothorax javanicus
(by Key of Life)

Giant Moray Eel | Gymnothorax javanicus

(by Key of Life)



Green Moray Eel | Gymnothorax funebris

"The moray eel is a relatively secretive animal, spending much of its time hiding in holes and crevices amongst the rocks and coral on the ocean floor. By spending the majority of their time hiding, moray eels are able to remain out of sight from predators and are also able to ambush any unsuspecting prey that passes." -

(by Mick’s Wet)

Green Moray Eel | Gymnothorax funebris

"The moray eel is a relatively secretive animal, spending much of its time hiding in holes and crevices amongst the rocks and coral on the ocean floor. By spending the majority of their time hiding, moray eels are able to remain out of sight from predators and are also able to ambush any unsuspecting prey that passes." -

(by Mick’s Wet)



Green Moray | Gymnothorax prasinus

“Green morays average 6 feet long and 30 pounds. (The largest specimen recorded was 10 feet long.) This reclusive, solitary animal is not considered dangerous, yet its enormous mouth contains rows of sharp teeth in both jaws and along the roof. Divers—whose arms may resemble an octopus to the poor-sighted moray—might suffer a nasty bite if they incautiously probe a lair.” -

(by Mick’s Wet)

Green Moray | Gymnothorax prasinus

Green morays average 6 feet long and 30 pounds. (The largest specimen recorded was 10 feet long.) This reclusive, solitary animal is not considered dangerous, yet its enormous mouth contains rows of sharp teeth in both jaws and along the roof. Divers—whose arms may resemble an octopus to the poor-sighted moray—might suffer a nasty bite if they incautiously probe a lair.” -

(by Mick’s Wet)



Snowflake Moray Eel | Echidna nebulosa
(by Lea’s UW Photography)

Snowflake Moray Eel | Echidna nebulosa

(by Lea’s UW Photography)