Snake Eel | Ophichthidae
(by Dermal Denticles)

Snake Eel | Ophichthidae

(by Dermal Denticles)



Garden Eels | Heterocongrinae

“Tightening its very muscular body to make itself rigid, a garden eel drives its pointy tail deep into the sandy sea floor. The skin in the tail contains a hard substance, so it isn’t hurt. Once the eel is deep enough, it wiggles its dorsal fin, pushing sand out of the hole. Slime from their skin cements the walls of their burrows, preventing cave-ins. Like many other reef animals, garden eels escape from predators by diving tail-first into reef-bottom burrows. When they’re not hiding, these fish sway in the current like blades of seagrass. Each eel lives in a single burrow, which they rarely ever leave.”  -

(by Mickle Huang)

Garden Eels | Heterocongrinae

Tightening its very muscular body to make itself rigid, a garden eel drives its pointy tail deep into the sandy sea floor. The skin in the tail contains a hard substance, so it isn’t hurt. Once the eel is deep enough, it wiggles its dorsal fin, pushing sand out of the hole. Slime from their skin cements the walls of their burrows, preventing cave-ins. Like many other reef animals, garden eels escape from predators by diving tail-first into reef-bottom burrows. When they’re not hiding, these fish sway in the current like blades of seagrass. Each eel lives in a single burrow, which they rarely ever leave.”  -

(by Mickle Huang)



White-Eyed Moray Eels | Gymnothorax thyrsoideus
(by Lea’s UW Photography)

White-Eyed Moray Eels | Gymnothorax thyrsoideus

(by Lea’s UW Photography)



Garden Eel | Heterocongrinae
(by giantwolf)

Garden Eel | Heterocongrinae

(by giantwolf)



Mosaic Moray Eel | Enchelycore ramosus

"The mosaic moray is a moray eel of the genus Enchelycore, found in south-east Australia and around the offshore islands off Northland on the North Island of New Zealand at depths down to 100 metres, in reef areas of broken rock. Their length is between 40 and 180 centimetres (up to 6 feet), making them the largest known member of their genus."    -

(by Waterdragon62)

Mosaic Moray Eel | Enchelycore ramosus

"The mosaic moray is a moray eel of the genus Enchelycore, found in south-east Australia and around the offshore islands off Northland on the North Island of New Zealand at depths down to 100 metres, in reef areas of broken rock. Their length is between 40 and 180 centimetres (up to 6 feet), making them the largest known member of their genus."    -

(by Waterdragon62)



Snowflake Moray Eel | Echidna nebulosa
(by divemecressi)

Snowflake Moray Eel | Echidna nebulosa

(by divemecressi)



Lipspot Moray Eel | Gymnothorax chilospilus
(by Mickle Huang)

Lipspot Moray Eel | Gymnothorax chilospilus

(by Mickle Huang)



Striped Eel Catfish | Plotosus lineatus

“Juvenile coral catfish form amazing and beautiful schools, and do not do well when separated. They may hide themselves and stop eating. Since they must be kept in groups and grow quite large as adults, they must be reserved for the largest home aquaria. As the Coral Cat matures, it begins to lose its schooling behavior.”   -

(by Lea’s UW Photography)

Striped Eel Catfish | Plotosus lineatus

Juvenile coral catfish form amazing and beautiful schools, and do not do well when separated. They may hide themselves and stop eating. Since they must be kept in groups and grow quite large as adults, they must be reserved for the largest home aquaria. As the Coral Cat matures, it begins to lose its schooling behavior.”   -

(by Lea’s UW Photography)




Moray Eel | Muraenidae

After moray eels spawn, the eggs hatch into larvae may drift in the currents for up to 12 months before settling to the bottom and taking the adult form. Juveniles live in tidal pools and adults live in deeper water. Moray eels can live for about 30 years.”   -

(Photos by Shinichi Morita)




Green Moray Eel | Gymnothorax funebris

"Part of the Moray Eels vicious reputation may come from the fact that they habitually open and close their mouths, which shows off their sharp teeth. Although this behavior may appear threatening, the eel is actually taking in water to breathe. The water passes over the gills and exits through vent-like openings at the back of the head."  -

(Photos by Giovanni Mari)



Snowflake Moray Eel | Echidna nebulosa

"The wild Snowflake Eel is a nocturnal predator, ambushing fish and crustaceans. In the tank, it will take frozen or freeze-dried krill, fish, shrimp, and most meaty foods. It can be taught to hand feed, although this should be done with caution, as it can inflict a painful bite."  -

(by bluewavechris)

Snowflake Moray Eel | Echidna nebulosa

"The wild Snowflake Eel is a nocturnal predator, ambushing fish and crustaceans. In the tank, it will take frozen or freeze-dried krill, fish, shrimp, and most meaty foods. It can be taught to hand feed, although this should be done with caution, as it can inflict a painful bite."  -

(by bluewavechris)



Moray Eel | Muraenidae
(by arie.eliens)

Moray Eel | Muraenidae

(by arie.eliens)



Blue Ribbon Eel | Rhinomuraena quaesita
(by DiverKen)

Blue Ribbon Eel | Rhinomuraena quaesita

(by DiverKen)



Moray Eel | Muraenidae

"The moray eel is a relatively secretive animal, spending much of its time hiding in holes and crevices amongst the rocks and coral on the ocean floor. By spending the majority of their time hiding, moray eels are able to remain out of sight from predators and are also able to ambush any unsuspecting prey that passes."   -

(Photo by Fabio Strazzi)

Moray Eel | Muraenidae

"The moray eel is a relatively secretive animal, spending much of its time hiding in holes and crevices amongst the rocks and coral on the ocean floor. By spending the majority of their time hiding, moray eels are able to remain out of sight from predators and are also able to ambush any unsuspecting prey that passes."   -

(Photo by Fabio Strazzi)



Blue Ribbon Eel | Rhinomuraena quaesita
(by Ashley Hauck)

Blue Ribbon Eel | Rhinomuraena quaesita

(by Ashley Hauck)