Hermit Crab | Paguroidea
(by FrogfishPhotos)

Hermit Crab | Paguroidea

(by FrogfishPhotos)



Saddleback Crawfish | Orconectes medius
(via perryeck)

Saddleback Crawfish | Orconectes medius

(via perryeck)



Red Fire Shrimp | Neocaridina heteropoda var. Fire Red
(by rwfoto_de)

Red Fire Shrimp | Neocaridina heteropoda var. Fire Red

(by rwfoto_de)



Golden Crayfish | Orconectes luteus
(via x!)

Golden Crayfish | Orconectes luteus

(via x!)



Yeti Crab | Kiwa hirsuta

"Discovered in 2005, the peculiar looking crustacean known as the yeti crab gets its name from the layer of "furry" setae that covers most of its body. Given the scientific name "Kiwa hirsuta" and sometimes called a “furry lobster”, the yeti crab was originally discovered in the Pacific Ocean near the Antarctic Ridge about 900 miles off the coast of Easter Island. Since then another species has been discovered and named “Kiwa puravida”.
Yeti crabs are known to inhabit the ocean floor and stay near hydrothermal vents, and due to their entire lives being spent on the ocean floor, they never develop the ability to see. The white hairy crabs are known to be unusually large for living where they do, with an average length of around 6 inches (15 centimeters), and are found at depths as deep as 7200 feet (2200 meters). The arms are actually covered in bacteria, which lives in the setae and is most likely a food source for the crab. Yeti crabs are also believed to feed off mussels, shrimp or algae. Their hair is possibly a means of sensing their surroundings. Not much else is known about the yeti crab, but it is believed to be a distant relative of the common hermit crab.”   -

(Photo by Avi_Abrams)

Yeti Crab | Kiwa hirsuta

"Discovered in 2005, the peculiar looking crustacean known as the yeti crab gets its name from the layer of "furry" setae that covers most of its body. Given the scientific name "Kiwa hirsuta" and sometimes called a “furry lobster”, the yeti crab was originally discovered in the Pacific Ocean near the Antarctic Ridge about 900 miles off the coast of Easter Island. Since then another species has been discovered and named “Kiwa puravida”.

Yeti crabs are known to inhabit the ocean floor and stay near hydrothermal vents, and due to their entire lives being spent on the ocean floor, they never develop the ability to see. The white hairy crabs are known to be unusually large for living where they do, with an average length of around 6 inches (15 centimeters), and are found at depths as deep as 7200 feet (2200 meters). The arms are actually covered in bacteria, which lives in the setae and is most likely a food source for the crab. Yeti crabs are also believed to feed off mussels, shrimp or algae. Their hair is possibly a means of sensing their surroundings. Not much else is known about the yeti crab, but it is believed to be a distant relative of the common hermit crab.”   -

(Photo by Avi_Abrams)



Peacock Mantis Shrimp | Odontodactylus scyllarus
(by Lea’s UW Photography)

Peacock Mantis Shrimp | Odontodactylus scyllarus

(by Lea’s UW Photography)



Southern Pagurid Crab | Pagurus sinuatus
(by Mick’s wet)

Southern Pagurid Crab | Pagurus sinuatus

(by Mick’s wet)




Ghost Crab | Ocypode quadrata

Ghost crabs dig burrows in the sand, where they seek shelter from the sun (sometimes plugging the burrow entrance with sand to keep out the heat) and “hibernate” during the winter. Burrows can be up to four feet deep, and are often found hundreds of feet from the water’s edge. Younger ghost crabs burrow close to the water, while older ghost crabs burrow higher up on the beach.”  -

(by gr8dnes)



Peacock Mantis Shrimp | Stomatopoda

"The peacock Mantis Shrimp is one of the more interesting species in the animal kingdom. It is multicolored with shades of bright green, orange, red, and blue on its shell, and its forearms are covered in spots. This ferocious crustacean has club-like appendages that fold under its body, similar to a praying mantis. The legs act like a spring to attack its prey."   -

(via bettydiver)

Peacock Mantis Shrimp | Stomatopoda

"The peacock Mantis Shrimp is one of the more interesting species in the animal kingdom. It is multicolored with shades of bright green, orange, red, and blue on its shell, and its forearms are covered in spots. This ferocious crustacean has club-like appendages that fold under its body, similar to a praying mantis. The legs act like a spring to attack its prey."   -

(via bettydiver)



Hawaiian Elegant Hermit Crab | Calcinus c.f. elegans
(by DRezendesPhoto)

Hawaiian Elegant Hermit Crab | Calcinus c.f. elegans

(by DRezendesPhoto)



Ghost Crab | Ocypode
(by Dave 2x)

Ghost Crab | Ocypode

(by Dave 2x)



Squat Lobster | Lauriea siagiani

“Two species of squat lobster are found along California coasts. These animals look like lobsters, but they’re more closely related to hermit crabs. Unlike their relatives, squat lobsters don’t carry shells on their backs. Instead, they squeeze into crevices—and leave their sharp claws exposed to keep neighboring lobsters away.
Squat lobsters also hide under rocks to protect their bodies. Safe from hungry fishes, they wait for snacks to settle nearby—those claws are perfect for reaching out and picking up food.Along with curling up in crevices and hiding under rocks, squat lobsters stake out their territory on sandy patches. They use their claws to scoop up sand and sift for sunken snacks.”  -

(by lndr)

Squat Lobster | Lauriea siagiani

Two species of squat lobster are found along California coasts. These animals look like lobsters, but they’re more closely related to hermit crabs. Unlike their relatives, squat lobsters don’t carry shells on their backs. Instead, they squeeze into crevices—and leave their sharp claws exposed to keep neighboring lobsters away.

Squat lobsters also hide under rocks to protect their bodies. Safe from hungry fishes, they wait for snacks to settle nearby—those claws are perfect for reaching out and picking up food.Along with curling up in crevices and hiding under rocks, squat lobsters stake out their territory on sandy patches. They use their claws to scoop up sand and sift for sunken snacks.”  -

(by lndr)



Ghost Nipper Shrimp | Trypaea australiensis
(by Silly Divers)

Ghost Nipper Shrimp | Trypaea australiensis

(by Silly Divers)



Common Lobster | Homarus gammarus
(by ToniTofa)

Common Lobster | Homarus gammarus

(by ToniTofa)



Emperor Shrimp | Periclimenes imperator
(by Luko Gecko)

Emperor Shrimp | Periclimenes imperator

(by Luko Gecko)