Peacock Mantis Shrimp with eggs | Odontodactylus scyllarus
(by Raffaele Livornese)

Peacock Mantis Shrimp with eggs | Odontodactylus scyllarus

(by Raffaele Livornese)



Porcelain Crab | Porcellanidae
(by genna S)

Porcelain Crab | Porcellanidae

(by genna S)



Mosaic Boxer Crab | Lybia tesselata 
(by divemecressi)

Mosaic Boxer Crab | Lybia tesselata

(by divemecressi)



Peacock Mantis Shrimp Carrying Eggs | Odontodactylus scyllarus
(by Luko Gecko)

Peacock Mantis Shrimp Carrying Eggs | Odontodactylus scyllarus

(by Luko Gecko)



Harlequin Shrimp | Hymenocera elegan
(by Kévin.B.)

Harlequin Shrimp | Hymenocera elegan

(by Kévin.B.)



Harlequin Shrimp | Hymenocera picta
(by hendradive)

Harlequin Shrimp | Hymenocera picta

(by hendradive)



Electric Orange Hermit Crab | Calcinus cf elegans

"The Electric Orange Hermit Crab is native to the Hawaiian Islands. Wild species make its home in abandoned snail or triton shells and pick amongst substrate and reef crevices for algae, seaweed, and other food sources. In the home aquarium, the Electric Orange Hermit Crab requires a similar, well-established environment with live rock outcroppings to forage amongst. With its voracious appetite for algae, the Electric Orange Hermit Crab will help keep green hair algae and cyanobacteria levels diminished in the aquarium. As an added benefit, this species of Calcinus also helps aerate your aquarium substrate as it sifts through the sand in search of food sources.” -

(by DRezendesPhoto)

Electric Orange Hermit Crab | Calcinus cf elegans

"The Electric Orange Hermit Crab is native to the Hawaiian Islands. Wild species make its home in abandoned snail or triton shells and pick amongst substrate and reef crevices for algae, seaweed, and other food sources. In the home aquarium, the Electric Orange Hermit Crab requires a similar, well-established environment with live rock outcroppings to forage amongst. With its voracious appetite for algae, the Electric Orange Hermit Crab will help keep green hair algae and cyanobacteria levels diminished in the aquarium. As an added benefit, this species of Calcinus also helps aerate your aquarium substrate as it sifts through the sand in search of food sources.” -

(by DRezendesPhoto)



Peacock Mantis Shrimp | Odontodactylus scyllarus
(by gerb)

Peacock Mantis Shrimp | Odontodactylus scyllarus

(by gerb)



Hermit Crabs | Paguroidea
(by Boyd Forrest)

Hermit Crabs | Paguroidea

(by Boyd Forrest)



Atlantic Ghost Crab | Ocypode quadrata
(by Lisa V. Oliveira)

Atlantic Ghost Crab | Ocypode quadrata

(by Lisa V. Oliveira)



Asian Shore Crab | Hemigraspus sanguineus
(by Wow thats a nice pic)

Asian Shore Crab | Hemigraspus sanguineus

(by Wow thats a nice pic)



Squat Lobster | Galatheoidea
(by Rowland Cain)

Squat Lobster | Galatheoidea

(by Rowland Cain)



Harlequin Shrimp | Hymenocera picta
(by Grant Stirton)

Harlequin Shrimp | Hymenocera picta

(by Grant Stirton)



Peacock Mantis Shrimp carrying Eggs | Odontodactylus scyllarus

“What is amazing about this creature is that its clubs strike at 50 miles per hour in milliseconds. One strike is 50 times faster than the blink of a human eye! It can punch 50,000 times between molts without damaging its clubs. The punch of a mantis shrimp is so strong that it can break through the shells of its prey and even thick glass.”  -

(by Luko Gecko)

Peacock Mantis Shrimp carrying Eggs | Odontodactylus scyllarus

What is amazing about this creature is that its clubs strike at 50 miles per hour in milliseconds. One strike is 50 times faster than the blink of a human eye! It can punch 50,000 times between molts without damaging its clubs. The punch of a mantis shrimp is so strong that it can break through the shells of its prey and even thick glass.”  -

(by Luko Gecko)



Hermit Crab | Paguroidea
(by FrogfishPhotos)

Hermit Crab | Paguroidea

(by FrogfishPhotos)