Cuttlefish eating a Filefish | Sepiida eating a Monacanthidae
(by FrogfishPhotos)

Cuttlefish eating a Filefish | Sepiida eating a Monacanthidae

(by FrogfishPhotos)



Stubby Squid | Rossia pacifica diegensis
(by 3ricj)

Stubby Squid | Rossia pacifica diegensis

(by 3ricj)



Atlantic White-spotted Octopus | Octopus macropus
(by ondaeoliana)

Atlantic White-spotted Octopus | Octopus macropus

(by ondaeoliana)



Blue Ring Octopus | Hapalochlaena

“The life cycle of the southern blue-ringed octopus, from mating through to the eggs hatching and the young reaching maturity, lasts for approximately seven months. The eggs are carried by the female throughout their development, which lasts for around two months, and the female does not eat during this time. Once hatched, the young grow rapidly and begin hunting live prey within one month. Young southern blue-ringed octopuses are thought to be venomous from birth, and their blue rings appear when they are about six weeks old.
This species reaches sexual maturity at just four months old, and may begin laying eggs a month after that. The adult female southern blue-ringed octopus dies shortly after the eggs have hatched, and both sexes are unlikely to live for more than one year.”  -

(by Lea’s UW Photography)

Blue Ring Octopus | Hapalochlaena

The life cycle of the southern blue-ringed octopus, from mating through to the eggs hatching and the young reaching maturity, lasts for approximately seven months. The eggs are carried by the female throughout their development, which lasts for around two months, and the female does not eat during this time. Once hatched, the young grow rapidly and begin hunting live prey within one month. Young southern blue-ringed octopuses are thought to be venomous from birth, and their blue rings appear when they are about six weeks old.

This species reaches sexual maturity at just four months old, and may begin laying eggs a month after that. The adult female southern blue-ringed octopus dies shortly after the eggs have hatched, and both sexes are unlikely to live for more than one year.”  -

(by Lea’s UW Photography)



Dumpling Squid | Euprymna tasmanica

"Newly-hatched young are morphologically well advanced, and can catch prey items up to twice their size. There is no generational overlap, and hatchlings have to survive from birth without parental care. Females die approximately 8-14 days after laying eggs; males will also die after mating, but do perform multiple matings with multiple females before death.”   -

(by Aquatic Ape)

Dumpling Squid | Euprymna tasmanica

"Newly-hatched young are morphologically well advanced, and can catch prey items up to twice their size. There is no generational overlap, and hatchlings have to survive from birth without parental care. Females die approximately 8-14 days after laying eggs; males will also die after mating, but do perform multiple matings with multiple females before death.”   -

(by Aquatic Ape)



Common Cuttlefish | Sepia officinalis

“Cephalopods are considered one of the most intelligent animals in the sea, and their cognitive abilities have been widely studied. Social learning in cuttlefish has been documented, and cuttlefish have even been trained in a lab to swim through T-shaped mazes.”  -

(by hsacdirk)

Common Cuttlefish | Sepia officinalis

Cephalopods are considered one of the most intelligent animals in the sea, and their cognitive abilities have been widely studied. Social learning in cuttlefish has been documented, and cuttlefish have even been trained in a lab to swim through T-shaped mazes.”  -

(by hsacdirk)



Dumbo Octopus | Grimpoteuthis

"Grimpoteuthis has one of the most unusual breeding capabilities of any marine life. Females necropsied have shown eggs in various stages of maturation which means that there is no breeding season and females can lay eggs continuously under small rocks or on shells in the deep ocean. Males have a separate protuberance on one of their arms that transports an encapsulated sperm packet into the female’s mantle. It is thought the female can utilize sperm for fertilization at almost any time.
Neutrally buoyant, they have several observed types of mobility. Flapping their Dumbo ear-like fins gets them moving with peculiar grace and ease. Expanding and contracting the webbing between their tentacles or by shooting water through their funnel cause a sudden thrust, useful for escaping a predator. Any of these methods for movement can be used separately or simultaneously. These octopus can also do the more ordinary octopus movements such as crawling on their tentacles.”  -

(Photo by OurBreathingPlanet)

Dumbo Octopus | Grimpoteuthis

"Grimpoteuthis has one of the most unusual breeding capabilities of any marine life. Females necropsied have shown eggs in various stages of maturation which means that there is no breeding season and females can lay eggs continuously under small rocks or on shells in the deep ocean. Males have a separate protuberance on one of their arms that transports an encapsulated sperm packet into the female’s mantle. It is thought the female can utilize sperm for fertilization at almost any time.

Neutrally buoyant, they have several observed types of mobility. Flapping their Dumbo ear-like fins gets them moving with peculiar grace and ease. Expanding and contracting the webbing between their tentacles or by shooting water through their funnel cause a sudden thrust, useful for escaping a predator. Any of these methods for movement can be used separately or simultaneously. These octopus can also do the more ordinary octopus movements such as crawling on their tentacles.”  -

(Photo by OurBreathingPlanet)



Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena

"It is most active after dark, and spends most of its day hidden in its nest. Like all octopods, the blue-ringed octopus has no skeleton and is thus very flexible and maneuverable. It can squeeze into tiny crevices and make dens in bottles, aluminum cans, or mollusk shells. The blue-ringed octopus is also known to burrow into sand or gravel to conceal itself."   -

(by Andrew Newton)

Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena

"It is most active after dark, and spends most of its day hidden in its nest. Like all octopods, the blue-ringed octopus has no skeleton and is thus very flexible and maneuverable. It can squeeze into tiny crevices and make dens in bottles, aluminum cans, or mollusk shells. The blue-ringed octopus is also known to burrow into sand or gravel to conceal itself."   -

(by Andrew Newton)



Unhatched Cuttlefish Egg | Sepiida

"Cuttlefish eggs, which are typically round or cylindrical in shape, are laid on the seabed, often attached to rocks or coral. They hatch in 1-2 months. After mating, males and females die and their cuttlebones are often washed up on beaches.”   -

(by deecfc67)

Unhatched Cuttlefish Egg | Sepiida

"Cuttlefish eggs, which are typically round or cylindrical in shape, are laid on the seabed, often attached to rocks or coral. They hatch in 1-2 months. After mating, males and females die and their cuttlebones are often washed up on beaches.”   -

(by deecfc67)



Striped Pyjama Squid | Sepioloidea lineolata

“Like other bobtail and bottletail squid, S. lineolata spend most of the day buried under the sand with only the eyes protruding. This helps them to both hide from predators and stalk passing prey such as shrimp and fish.”   -

(by Rowland Cain)

Striped Pyjama Squid | Sepioloidea lineolata

Like other bobtail and bottletail squid, S. lineolata spend most of the day buried under the sand with only the eyes protruding. This helps them to both hide from predators and stalk passing prey such as shrimp and fish.”   -

(by Rowland Cain)



Octopus | Octopus vulgaris
(by ckom1)

Octopus | Octopus vulgaris

(by ckom1)



Cuttlefish | Sepiida
(by DerekBrad)

Cuttlefish | Sepiida

(by DerekBrad)



Broadclub Cuttlefish | Sepia latimanus

"Broadclub cuttlefishes, Sepia latimanus, hunt during the day and appears to mesmerize prey with its rhythmic colored bands. They feed on small fishes and crustaceans.”  -

(by Okinawa Nature Photography)

Broadclub Cuttlefish | Sepia latimanus

"Broadclub cuttlefishes, Sepia latimanus, hunt during the day and appears to mesmerize prey with its rhythmic colored bands. They feed on small fishes and crustaceans.”  -

(by Okinawa Nature Photography)



Southern Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena Maculosa 
(by Bush-y)

Southern Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena Maculosa

(by Bush-y)




Coconut Octopus in a shell | Amphioctopus marginatus

The Coconut Octopus is named so for a very peculiar behavior: it carries coconut shells and clam shells across the ocean floor and uses them to build fortresses. it is the only invertebrate known to use tools, and one of only two octopuses known to exhibit bipedal behavior by “walking” on two of it’s legs.”  -

(Photos by Allison Finch)