Blue Corydora | Corydoras nattereri
(by Cinthia Emerich)

Blue Corydora | Corydoras nattereri

(by Cinthia Emerich)



Powder Blue Gourami | Colisa lalia variation ‘Powder Blue’
(by Claudia 木之本 Barzaeva)

Powder Blue Gourami | Colisa lalia variation ‘Powder Blue’

(by Claudia 木之本 Barzaeva)



Blue Streak Cleaner Wrasse | Labroides dimidiatus
(by Boris_44)

Blue Streak Cleaner Wrasse | Labroides dimidiatus

(by Boris_44)



Bluegill Fry | Lepomis macrochirus
(by Lance Merry)

Bluegill Fry | Lepomis macrochirus

(by Lance Merry)



Blue Ring Octopus | Hapalochlaena

“The life cycle of the southern blue-ringed octopus, from mating through to the eggs hatching and the young reaching maturity, lasts for approximately seven months. The eggs are carried by the female throughout their development, which lasts for around two months, and the female does not eat during this time. Once hatched, the young grow rapidly and begin hunting live prey within one month. Young southern blue-ringed octopuses are thought to be venomous from birth, and their blue rings appear when they are about six weeks old.
This species reaches sexual maturity at just four months old, and may begin laying eggs a month after that. The adult female southern blue-ringed octopus dies shortly after the eggs have hatched, and both sexes are unlikely to live for more than one year.”  -

(by Lea’s UW Photography)

Blue Ring Octopus | Hapalochlaena

The life cycle of the southern blue-ringed octopus, from mating through to the eggs hatching and the young reaching maturity, lasts for approximately seven months. The eggs are carried by the female throughout their development, which lasts for around two months, and the female does not eat during this time. Once hatched, the young grow rapidly and begin hunting live prey within one month. Young southern blue-ringed octopuses are thought to be venomous from birth, and their blue rings appear when they are about six weeks old.

This species reaches sexual maturity at just four months old, and may begin laying eggs a month after that. The adult female southern blue-ringed octopus dies shortly after the eggs have hatched, and both sexes are unlikely to live for more than one year.”  -

(by Lea’s UW Photography)



Blue-Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena

“Biting with their beak and releasing their neurotoxin via saliva, the blue-ringed octopus will wait until the victim is rendered useless before consuming. One type of toxin is used to kill the prey and the other is used as a defense. It is even speculated that they don’t need to bite their prey at all, casting the venom near their prey may be all that is needed to kill.”   -

(by nadeika_k)

Blue-Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena

Biting with their beak and releasing their neurotoxin via saliva, the blue-ringed octopus will wait until the victim is rendered useless before consuming. One type of toxin is used to kill the prey and the other is used as a defense. It is even speculated that they don’t need to bite their prey at all, casting the venom near their prey may be all that is needed to kill.”   -

(by nadeika_k)



Bulb-Tentacled Anemone | Entacmaea qaudicolor

"The Bulb or Bubble Tip Anemone is found in oceans around the world. The Bulb Anemone attaches its pedal disc deep within dead coral amongst rubble or on solid, living reefs."   -

(by Waterdragon62)

Bulb-Tentacled Anemone | Entacmaea qaudicolor

"The Bulb or Bubble Tip Anemone is found in oceans around the world. The Bulb Anemone attaches its pedal disc deep within dead coral amongst rubble or on solid, living reefs."   -

(by Waterdragon62)



Blue Button Jellyfish | Porpita porpita

"Blue button jellyfish are hermaphrodites (i.e. both male and female). They release both eggs and sperm into the water. When the eggs have been fertilised by the sperm, they develop into larvae that subsequently metamorphose into individual polyps. A Blue Button colony forms when one polyp divides to form new types of polyps which become specialised for different functions."   -

(Photo by James Alexander Park)

Blue Button Jellyfish | Porpita porpita

"Blue button jellyfish are hermaphrodites (i.e. both male and female). They release both eggs and sperm into the water. When the eggs have been fertilised by the sperm, they develop into larvae that subsequently metamorphose into individual polyps. A Blue Button colony forms when one polyp divides to form new types of polyps which become specialised for different functions."   -

(Photo by James Alexander Park)



Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena

"It is most active after dark, and spends most of its day hidden in its nest. Like all octopods, the blue-ringed octopus has no skeleton and is thus very flexible and maneuverable. It can squeeze into tiny crevices and make dens in bottles, aluminum cans, or mollusk shells. The blue-ringed octopus is also known to burrow into sand or gravel to conceal itself."   -

(by Andrew Newton)

Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena

"It is most active after dark, and spends most of its day hidden in its nest. Like all octopods, the blue-ringed octopus has no skeleton and is thus very flexible and maneuverable. It can squeeze into tiny crevices and make dens in bottles, aluminum cans, or mollusk shells. The blue-ringed octopus is also known to burrow into sand or gravel to conceal itself."   -

(by Andrew Newton)



Blue-Lined Octopus | Hapalochlaena fasciata

"This species is highly toxic. The venom is produced by bacteria housed in the salivary glands of the octopus, and injected into the prey through a bite from its small parrot-like beak. It is responsible for at least one human death, where voluntary muscles are paralysed – so while the heart continues to beat, death is caused by breathing failure."  -

(by lndr)

Blue-Lined Octopus | Hapalochlaena fasciata

"This species is highly toxic. The venom is produced by bacteria housed in the salivary glands of the octopus, and injected into the prey through a bite from its small parrot-like beak. It is responsible for at least one human death, where voluntary muscles are paralysed – so while the heart continues to beat, death is caused by breathing failure."  -

(by lndr)



Spotted Blue Eye Rainbowfish | Pseudomugil gertrudae
(by Elma_Ben)

Spotted Blue Eye Rainbowfish | Pseudomugil gertrudae

(by Elma_Ben)




Blue Shark | Prionace glauca

Blue sharks feed ravenously on large schools of squid. While feeding on the squid some blue sharks will charge into the groups with their mouths agape, engulfing large numbers of them. They also feed on pelagic fishes such as cod, haddock, mackerel, tuna, herring and swordfish.” -

(by JCP van Uffelen)



Atlantic Blue Fin Tuna | Thunnus thynnus

"Atlantic bluefins are warm-blooded, a rare trait among fish, and are comfortable in the cold waters off Newfoundland and Iceland, as well as the tropical waters of the Gulf of Mexico and the Mediterranean Sea, where they go each year to spawn. They are among the most ambitiously migratory of all fish, and some tagged specimens have been tracked swimming from North American to European waters several times a year."  -

(by Nuno Vasco Rodrigues)

Atlantic Blue Fin Tuna | Thunnus thynnus

"Atlantic bluefins are warm-blooded, a rare trait among fish, and are comfortable in the cold waters off Newfoundland and Iceland, as well as the tropical waters of the Gulf of Mexico and the Mediterranean Sea, where they go each year to spawn. They are among the most ambitiously migratory of all fish, and some tagged specimens have been tracked swimming from North American to European waters several times a year."  -

(by Nuno Vasco Rodrigues)



Southern Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena Maculosa 
(by Bush-y)

Southern Blue Ringed Octopus | Hapalochlaena Maculosa

(by Bush-y)



Blue Button Jellyfish | Porpita porpita
(by Littoraria)

Blue Button Jellyfish | Porpita porpita

(by Littoraria)