Orange Clownfish | Amphiprion percula
(by Scott Hanko)

Orange Clownfish | Amphiprion percula

(by Scott Hanko)



False Clown Anemonefish | Amphiprion ocellaris
(by kwonyee88)

False Clown Anemonefish | Amphiprion ocellaris

(by kwonyee88)



Reef Manta Rays | Manta alfredi
(by Justin Ebert)

Reef Manta Rays | Manta alfredi

(by Justin Ebert)



Caribbean Reef Sharks | Carcharhinus perezi

“This species is commonly observed laying on the bottom in caves and under ledges, often in an apparent torpor as if sleeping. They have been called the sleeping shark, although there is no evidence that it is actually asleep when resting.
These sharks have and uses six keen senses; olfactory, visual, tactile ( including vibration sensitivity through a lateralis canal system), auditory, gustatory, and electric reception. The Caribbean reef shark is especially adapted to detecting low frequency sounds (indicative of a struggling fish nearby).” -

(by alfonsator)

Caribbean Reef Sharks | Carcharhinus perezi

This species is commonly observed laying on the bottom in caves and under ledges, often in an apparent torpor as if sleeping. They have been called the sleeping shark, although there is no evidence that it is actually asleep when resting.

These sharks have and uses six keen senses; olfactory, visual, tactile ( including vibration sensitivity through a lateralis canal system), auditory, gustatory, and electric reception. The Caribbean reef shark is especially adapted to detecting low frequency sounds (indicative of a struggling fish nearby).” -

(by alfonsator)



Splendid Toadfish | Sanopus splendidus

"Despite its brilliant coloring, the Splendid Toadfish is a shy creature and is pretty difficult to coax: you can generally find it under or around crevices and coral heads in clear water, at a depth of about 10-25m. It is at night that the toadfish comes out, since it’s a nocturnal hunter: it feeds on small fish, snails and polychaete worms. So night dives are a good time to spot it."  -

(by Zé Eduardo…)

Splendid Toadfish | Sanopus splendidus

"Despite its brilliant coloring, the Splendid Toadfish is a shy creature and is pretty difficult to coax: you can generally find it under or around crevices and coral heads in clear water, at a depth of about 10-25m. It is at night that the toadfish comes out, since it’s a nocturnal hunter: it feeds on small fish, snails and polychaete worms. So night dives are a good time to spot it."  -

(by Zé Eduardo…)



Hogfish | Lachnolaimus maximus

“The hogfish gets its unusual name from its long, pig-like snout and protrusible mouth which it uses to root around the sea bottom for food. The hogfish belongs to the second largest family of marine fishes, the wrasses, but instead of a cigar-shaped body like most wrasses, the hogfish is laterally compressed and round.
Hogfish have a fascinating life history; they are protogynous hermaphrodites, meaning that individuals first function sexually as females and then later, upon reaching a larger size, transform into males. This change generally occurs at around three years of age and a length of about 35 centimetres.”

(by Scott Hanko)

Hogfish | Lachnolaimus maximus

The hogfish gets its unusual name from its long, pig-like snout and protrusible mouth which it uses to root around the sea bottom for food. The hogfish belongs to the second largest family of marine fishes, the wrasses, but instead of a cigar-shaped body like most wrasses, the hogfish is laterally compressed and round.

Hogfish have a fascinating life history; they are protogynous hermaphrodites, meaning that individuals first function sexually as females and then later, upon reaching a larger size, transform into males. This change generally occurs at around three years of age and a length of about 35 centimetres.

(by Scott Hanko)



Ocellate Damselfish | Pomacentrus vaiuli
(by Nick Hobgood)

Ocellate Damselfish | Pomacentrus vaiuli

(by Nick Hobgood)



Pink Anemonefish | Amphiprion perideraion
(by deecfc67)

Pink Anemonefish | Amphiprion perideraion

(by deecfc67)



Anemonefish | Amphiprioninae
(by edpdiver)

Anemonefish | Amphiprioninae

(by edpdiver)



Reef Manta Ray | Manta alfredi

“We know that there are 11 species in the ray family, counting both manta rays and mobula rays (now among the world’s most threatened fish). Manta rays were only split into two species in 2009, and there’s reason to believe there is a third species residing in the Atlantic.”  -

(by Fabrice Jaine)

Reef Manta Ray | Manta alfredi

We know that there are 11 species in the ray family, counting both manta rays and mobula rays (now among the world’s most threatened fish). Manta rays were only split into two species in 2009, and there’s reason to believe there is a third species residing in the Atlantic.”  -

(by Fabrice Jaine)



Lipspot Moray Eel | Gymnothorax chilospilus
(by Mickle Huang)

Lipspot Moray Eel | Gymnothorax chilospilus

(by Mickle Huang)



Mandarinfish | Synchiropus splendidus

“The mandarin fish does not have scales. So for defense against predators, the species secretes a foul-tasting, toxic mucus and its distinctive colors warn larger fish not to eat it. The mucus also protects the fish from parasites." -

(by mve_Bob)

Mandarinfish | Synchiropus splendidus

The mandarin fish does not have scales. So for defense against predators, the species secretes a foul-tasting, toxic mucus and its distinctive colors warn larger fish not to eat it. The mucus also protects the fish from parasites.-

(by mve_Bob)




Hammer Reef Coral (Euphyllia ancora) and Haitian Reef Anemone (Condylactis sp.)

(by Samantha Velasquez)



Poison Goby | Gobiodon citrinus
(by Wolfgang Bittermann)

Poison Goby | Gobiodon citrinus

(by Wolfgang Bittermann)




Maroon Clownfish | Premnas biaculeatus

(Photos by Schoeneberger)