Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

“Pygmy seahorses are morphologically distinct from all other seahorses.  Apart from their extremely small size, they have a single gill opening on the back of the head (all other seahorses have a pair of gill openings either side of the head) and the young are brooded within the male’s trunk rather than a pouch on the tail.” -

(by PacificKlaus)

Pygmy Seahorse | Hippocampus bargibanti

Pygmy seahorses are morphologically distinct from all other seahorses.  Apart from their extremely small size, they have a single gill opening on the back of the head (all other seahorses have a pair of gill openings either side of the head) and the young are brooded within the male’s trunk rather than a pouch on the tail.” -

(by PacificKlaus)



Caribbean Reef Shark | Carcharhinus perezi
(by Alastair Pollock)

Caribbean Reef Shark | Carcharhinus perezi

(by Alastair Pollock)



Honeycomb Coral | Diploastrea heliopora
(by Okinawa Nature Photography)

Honeycomb Coral | Diploastrea heliopora

(by Okinawa Nature Photography)



Arc-Eyed Hawkfish | Paracirrhites arcatus
(by Steve Gillespie1)

Arc-Eyed Hawkfish | Paracirrhites arcatus

(by Steve Gillespie1)



Pink Skunk Clownfish | Amphiprion perideraion
(by Scott Rettig)

Pink Skunk Clownfish | Amphiprion perideraion

(by Scott Rettig)



Raccoon Butterflyfish | Pomacentrus lunula

“Named for the black mask-like marking over it’s eyes, the Raccoon Butterflyfish is a hardy Butterflyfish that is well known for eating almost any type of anemone. This is especially useful if you have problems with Aiptaisia or Majano anemones. Like the mammal to which it is named after, the Raccoon Butterflyfish is predominately a nocturnal feeder but will increase with activity during the daytime photoperiod as it grows accustomed to the bright lighting in the aquarium. If you intend on keeping more than one Raccoon Butterflyfish in your aquarium it is best to purchase two of the same size and introduce them to the aquarium at the same time. They may chase each other but it is rare that any damage is done.” -

(by bodiver)

Raccoon Butterflyfish | Pomacentrus lunula

Named for the black mask-like marking over it’s eyes, the Raccoon Butterflyfish is a hardy Butterflyfish that is well known for eating almost any type of anemone. This is especially useful if you have problems with Aiptaisia or Majano anemones. Like the mammal to which it is named after, the Raccoon Butterflyfish is predominately a nocturnal feeder but will increase with activity during the daytime photoperiod as it grows accustomed to the bright lighting in the aquarium. If you intend on keeping more than one Raccoon Butterflyfish in your aquarium it is best to purchase two of the same size and introduce them to the aquarium at the same time. They may chase each other but it is rare that any damage is done.” -

(by bodiver)



Black Tipped Reef Shark | Carcharhinus melanopterus
(by edpdiver)

Black Tipped Reef Shark | Carcharhinus melanopterus

(by edpdiver)



Black-tip Reef Shark | Carcharhinus melanopterus
(by echeng)

Black-tip Reef Shark | Carcharhinus melanopterus

(by echeng)



Blacktip Reef Shark | Carcharhinus

“The Blacktip Reef Shark is named for the easily recognizable black tips on its dorsal and caudal fins. It has a short, round snout and angled, saw-like teeth. It has a white belly and a dark back in order to camouflage itself with the ocean floor and bright ocean surface.
Blacktip Reef Sharks swim in shallow waters just a few meters deep near reefs and drop-off zones. Although they primarily live in shallow ocean waters, there have been occasional sightings of Blacktip Reef Sharks in freshwater.” -

(by sharkdefenders)

Blacktip Reef Shark | Carcharhinus

The Blacktip Reef Shark is named for the easily recognizable black tips on its dorsal and caudal fins. It has a short, round snout and angled, saw-like teeth. It has a white belly and a dark back in order to camouflage itself with the ocean floor and bright ocean surface.

Blacktip Reef Sharks swim in shallow waters just a few meters deep near reefs and drop-off zones. Although they primarily live in shallow ocean waters, there have been occasional sightings of Blacktip Reef Sharks in freshwater.” -

(by sharkdefenders)



Orange Clownfish | Amphiprion percula
(by Scott Hanko)

Orange Clownfish | Amphiprion percula

(by Scott Hanko)



False Clown Anemonefish | Amphiprion ocellaris
(by kwonyee88)

False Clown Anemonefish | Amphiprion ocellaris

(by kwonyee88)



Reef Manta Rays | Manta alfredi
(by Justin Ebert)

Reef Manta Rays | Manta alfredi

(by Justin Ebert)



Caribbean Reef Sharks | Carcharhinus perezi

“This species is commonly observed laying on the bottom in caves and under ledges, often in an apparent torpor as if sleeping. They have been called the sleeping shark, although there is no evidence that it is actually asleep when resting.
These sharks have and uses six keen senses; olfactory, visual, tactile ( including vibration sensitivity through a lateralis canal system), auditory, gustatory, and electric reception. The Caribbean reef shark is especially adapted to detecting low frequency sounds (indicative of a struggling fish nearby).” -

(by alfonsator)

Caribbean Reef Sharks | Carcharhinus perezi

This species is commonly observed laying on the bottom in caves and under ledges, often in an apparent torpor as if sleeping. They have been called the sleeping shark, although there is no evidence that it is actually asleep when resting.

These sharks have and uses six keen senses; olfactory, visual, tactile ( including vibration sensitivity through a lateralis canal system), auditory, gustatory, and electric reception. The Caribbean reef shark is especially adapted to detecting low frequency sounds (indicative of a struggling fish nearby).” -

(by alfonsator)



Splendid Toadfish | Sanopus splendidus

"Despite its brilliant coloring, the Splendid Toadfish is a shy creature and is pretty difficult to coax: you can generally find it under or around crevices and coral heads in clear water, at a depth of about 10-25m. It is at night that the toadfish comes out, since it’s a nocturnal hunter: it feeds on small fish, snails and polychaete worms. So night dives are a good time to spot it."  -

(by Zé Eduardo…)

Splendid Toadfish | Sanopus splendidus

"Despite its brilliant coloring, the Splendid Toadfish is a shy creature and is pretty difficult to coax: you can generally find it under or around crevices and coral heads in clear water, at a depth of about 10-25m. It is at night that the toadfish comes out, since it’s a nocturnal hunter: it feeds on small fish, snails and polychaete worms. So night dives are a good time to spot it."  -

(by Zé Eduardo…)



Hogfish | Lachnolaimus maximus

“The hogfish gets its unusual name from its long, pig-like snout and protrusible mouth which it uses to root around the sea bottom for food. The hogfish belongs to the second largest family of marine fishes, the wrasses, but instead of a cigar-shaped body like most wrasses, the hogfish is laterally compressed and round.
Hogfish have a fascinating life history; they are protogynous hermaphrodites, meaning that individuals first function sexually as females and then later, upon reaching a larger size, transform into males. This change generally occurs at around three years of age and a length of about 35 centimetres.”

(by Scott Hanko)

Hogfish | Lachnolaimus maximus

The hogfish gets its unusual name from its long, pig-like snout and protrusible mouth which it uses to root around the sea bottom for food. The hogfish belongs to the second largest family of marine fishes, the wrasses, but instead of a cigar-shaped body like most wrasses, the hogfish is laterally compressed and round.

Hogfish have a fascinating life history; they are protogynous hermaphrodites, meaning that individuals first function sexually as females and then later, upon reaching a larger size, transform into males. This change generally occurs at around three years of age and a length of about 35 centimetres.

(by Scott Hanko)