Demon Stinger | Inimicus didactylus
(by divemecressi)

Demon Stinger | Inimicus didactylus

(by divemecressi)



Halfmoon Betta | Betta splendens
(by Aquariumloto)

Halfmoon Betta | Betta splendens

(by Aquariumloto)



Bangka Snakehead | Channa bankanensis
(by bleoster)

Bangka Snakehead | Channa bankanensis

(by bleoster)



Orange Clownfish | Amphiprion percula
(by FabricePics)

Orange Clownfish | Amphiprion percula

(by FabricePics)



Blind Cave Tetra | Astyanax jordani

“Hardy and peaceful, it’s actually an excellent choice for the beginner and suitable for most community aquaria, though very shy or sluggish tankmates are best-avoided. It sometimes nips at tankmates when feeding, but this is more attributable to its searching technique than aggression. Although it can’t be described as gregarious it doesn seem to fare better when maintained in a group and we suggest the purchase of at least four individuals.” -

(by Cinthia Emerich)

Blind Cave Tetra | Astyanax jordani

Hardy and peaceful, it’s actually an excellent choice for the beginner and suitable for most community aquaria, though very shy or sluggish tankmates are best-avoided. It sometimes nips at tankmates when feeding, but this is more attributable to its searching technique than aggression. Although it can’t be described as gregarious it doesn seem to fare better when maintained in a group and we suggest the purchase of at least four individuals.” -

(by Cinthia Emerich)



Betta | Betta splendens
(by captplanetrocksmysocks)

Betta | Betta splendens

(by captplanetrocksmysocks)



(by bitanu100)

(by bitanu100)



Peacock Flounder | Bothus mancus

“In shallow waters, peacock flounders live on sandy bottoms of coastal coral reefs and lagoons. Sometimes, these fish take a break on smooth rocks. This flounder will even bury itself under the sand, leaving only its eyes sticking out from the sand. These flounders can be found to depths of 280 feet (84 m).” -

(by photos by mhl)

Peacock Flounder | Bothus mancus

In shallow waters, peacock flounders live on sandy bottoms of coastal coral reefs and lagoons. Sometimes, these fish take a break on smooth rocks. This flounder will even bury itself under the sand, leaving only its eyes sticking out from the sand. These flounders can be found to depths of 280 feet (84 m).” -

(by photos by mhl)



Tiger Shark | Galeocerdo cuvier
(by samui13coconut13)

Tiger Shark | Galeocerdo cuvier

(by samui13coconut13)



Halfmoon Betta | Betta splendens
(by bettaaddict)

Halfmoon Betta | Betta splendens

(by bettaaddict)



Koi | Cyprinus carpio
(by eneko123)

Koi | Cyprinus carpio

(by eneko123)



Great White Shark | Carcharodon carcharias
(by Shark Zone)

Great White Shark | Carcharodon carcharias

(by Shark Zone)



Common Dolphin Eating a Sardine | Delphinus eating a Sardina pilchardus
(by Paul Cowell)

Common Dolphin Eating a Sardine | Delphinus eating a Sardina pilchardus

(by Paul Cowell)



Orange Clownfish | Amphiprion percula
(by Scott Hanko)

Orange Clownfish | Amphiprion percula

(by Scott Hanko)



Blacktip Reef Shark | Carcharhinus melanopterus

“Blacktip reef sharks live in shallow lagoons and on coral reefs near reef drop-offs. In general, these sharks do not swim deeper than 33 feet (10 m), but can be found as far as 250 feet (75 m) down. These fish also live in mangrove areas, moving in and out with the tide. Blacktip reef sharks even venture into fresh water but don’t swim too far in from the ocean. 
These sharks are active swimmers that can most often be found cruising along the bottom. Sometimes blacktip reef sharks can be found swimming at the surface in very shallow waters. They will travel alone or in small groups.” -

(by PacificKlaus)

Blacktip Reef Shark | Carcharhinus melanopterus

Blacktip reef sharks live in shallow lagoons and on coral reefs near reef drop-offs. In general, these sharks do not swim deeper than 33 feet (10 m), but can be found as far as 250 feet (75 m) down. These fish also live in mangrove areas, moving in and out with the tide. Blacktip reef sharks even venture into fresh water but don’t swim too far in from the ocean. 

These sharks are active swimmers that can most often be found cruising along the bottom. Sometimes blacktip reef sharks can be found swimming at the surface in very shallow waters. They will travel alone or in small groups.” -

(by PacificKlaus)